Carnegiea gigantea, Giant Saguaro

Southwest Desert Flora

Home to the plants of the Sonoran, Chihuahuan and Mojave Deserts

Cirsium ochrocentrum, Yellowspine Thistle

Anthriscus caucalis, Burr Chervil


Scientific Name: Anthriscus caucalis
Common Name: Burr Chervil

Also Called: Bur-chervil, Bur Parsley

Family: Apiaceae [Umbelliferae] Parsley or Carrot Family

Synonyms: (Anthriscus neglecta var. scandix, Anthriscus scandicina)

Status: Naturalized; native to Europe and Asia.

Duration: Annual

Size: 18 to 40 inches (4.5 to 10 dm)

Growth Form: Forb/herb; plants send up thin hollow stems.

Leaves: Green, light green; triangular shape variable; oblong to triangular-ovate, pinnately-dissected with many small leaflets; petiole present.

Flower Color: White, inflorescence and umbel; fruit small, about 3 or 4mm long; ovoid with small hooked spines (beak).

Flowering Season: April to June

Elevation: Below 5,000 feet (1,500 m)

Habitat Preferences: Disturbed shady moist areas.

Recorded Range: Generally in the western half of North America, north throughout British Columbia and middle-eastern North America northward into Ontario, Canada.

North America & US County Distribution Map for Anthriscus caucalis.

U.S. Weed Information: Although not listed by the United States government Burr Chervil is an introduced weedy plant. It is common and native to parts of Europe and Asia.

Invasive/Noxious Weed Information: No information available.
Wetland Indicator: No information available.
Threatened/Endangered Information: No information available.

Genus Information: In North America there are 3 species in Anthriscus. Worldwide, The Plant List includes 16 accepted species names and a further 24 scientific names of infraspecific rank for Anthriscus.

In the Southwestern United States: Arizona has 1 species of genus, California has 1 species, Nevada. New Mexico, Texas and Utah have 0 species. All data is approximate and subject to taxonomic changes.

Comments: The are 3 introduced species of Anthriscus in North America. One species in particular, the common cooking spice Anthriscus cerefolium, (Chervil) looks similar to Burr Chervil.

Etymology:
The genus Anthriscus is an ancient Greek name with an unknown descriptive reference. The species epithet caucalis is a Greek plant name likely a reference to the region of Caucasus which is one of the native locals for this species.

Ethnobotany
No information available

Date Profile Completed: 08/07/2019
References:
Lincoln Constance & Margriet Wetherwax 2012, Anthriscus caucalis, in Jepson Flora Project (eds.) Jepson eFlora, http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/eflora/eflora_display.php?tid=13523, accessed on August 06, 2019.
Calflora: Information on California plants for education, research and conservation, with data contributed by public and private institutions and individuals, including the Consortium of California Herbaria. [web application]. 2019. Berkeley, California: The Calflora Database [a non-profit organization]. Available: https://www.calflora.org/ (Accessed: Aug 06, 2019).
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service on-line database and USGS ITIS search - (accessed 08/06/2019 )
Wikipedia contributors. "Anthriscus caucalis." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 20 Jun. 2019. Web. 6 Aug. 2019.
The Plant List (2013). Version 1.1. Published on the Internet; http://www.theplantlist.org/ (accessed 08/06/2019).
http://www.theplantlist.org/browse/A/Apiaceae/Anthriscus/
Invasive Plants Atlas of the United States
https://www.invasiveplantatlas.org/index.cfm, accessed on August 06, 2019
iNaturalist Website:
https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/52846-Anthriscus-caucalis, accessed on August 06, 2019
SEINet synonyms, scientific names, geographic locations, general information, (accessed 08/06/2019).
http://swbiodiversity.org/seinet/